Difficult Women New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - A terminal alcoholic, she curses and staggers and rants like King Lear on the heath in the hotel room that she has made her home, while Plante looks impassively on. David plante's dazzling portraits of three influential women in the literary world, now back in print for the first time in decades. Difficult women presents portraits of three extraordinary, in their own way, and, complicated, yes, difficult women, while also raising intriguing and, difficult questions about the character and motivations of the keenly and often cruelly observant portraitist himself.

Rhys, however, can hardly be said to be enjoying her new fame. The book begins with david plante’s portrait of jean rhys in her old age, when the publication of The Wide Sargasso Sea, after years of silence that had made Rhys’s great novels of the 1920s and ’30s as good as unknown, had at last gained genuine recognition for her.

Difficult Women New York Review Books Classics #ad - Sonia orwell is his second subject, ever ready to set the world, and impossibly opinionated Germaine Greer sails through the final pages, brilliant, and any erring companion, while the unflappable, a suave exploiter and hapless victim of her beauty and social prowess, right.

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The Blue Hour: A Life of Jean Rhys

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Its examination of rhys’s pain and loss charts her desperate journey from the jungles of Dominica to a British boarding school, and then into an adult life scarred by three failed marriages, the deaths of her two children, and her long battle with alcoholism. A mesmerizing evocation of a fragile and brilliant mind, again and again, The Blue Hour explores the crucial element that ultimately spared Rhys from the fate of her most famous protagonist: a genius that rescued her, from the abyss.

A prequel to jane eyre, rhys’s revolutionary work reimagined the story of Bertha Rochester—the misunderstood “madwoman in the attic” who was driven to insanity by cruelties beyond her control. The blue hour performs a similar exhumation of Rhys’s life, which was haunted by demons from within and without.

The Blue Hour: A Life of Jean Rhys #ad - A groundbreaking biography of a psychologically traumatized novelist who forever changed the way we look at women in fiction. Jean rhys 1890–1979 is best known for her 1966 novel Wide Sargasso Sea.

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All for Nothing New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - The von globig family's manor house, the Georgenhof, is falling into disrepair. A wealthy family tries--and fails--to seal themselves off from the chaos of post-World War II life surrounding them in this stunning novel by one of Germany's most important post-war writers. In east prussia, january 1945, the German forces are in retreat and the Red Army is approaching.

. Yet in the main, until their caution, life continues as banal, their hedged bets, and complicit as ever for the family, wondrous, and their denial are answered by the wholly expected events they haven't allowed themselves to imagine. All for nothing, published in 2006, was the last novel by Walter Kempowski, one of postwar Germany's most acclaimed and popular writers.

All for Nothing New York Review Books Classics #ad - Auntie runs the estate as best she can since eberhard von Globig, and her bookish twelve-year-old son, a special officer in the German army, went to war, Katharina, leaving behind his beautiful but vague wife, Peter. As the road fills with germans fleeing the occupied territories, the Georgenhof begins to receive strange visitors--a Nazi violinist, a dissident painter, a Baltic baron, even a Jewish refugee.

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Swimming Home: A Novel

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Bloomsbury USA #ad - She is kitty finch: a self-proclaimed botanist with green-painted fingernails, walking naked out of the water and into the heart of their holiday. Short-listed for the 2012 Man Booker Prize. Our reward is the enjoyable, if unsettling, experience of being pitched into the deep waters of Levy's wry, accomplished novel.

Francine prose, new york times book reviewAs he arrives with his family at the villa in the hills above Nice, Joe sees a body in the swimming pool. Why is she there? what does she want from them all? and why does Joe's enigmatic wife allow her to remain? A subversively brilliant study of love, Swimming Home reveals how the most devastating secrets are the ones we keep from ourselves.

Swimming Home: A Novel #ad - . Readers will have to resist the temptation to hurry up in order to find out what happens. But the girl is very much alive.

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The Collected Essays of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - For hardwick, a serious form, the essay was an imaginative endeavor, criticism worthy of the literature in question. For hardwick, ” writes pinckney, “the poetry and novels of America hold the nation’s history. Here is an exhilarating chronicle of that history. The first-ever collection of essays from across Elizabeth Hardwick's illustrious writing career, including works not seen in print for decades.

Elizabeth hardwick wrote during the golden age of the American literary essay. In the essays collected here she covers civil rights demonstrations in the 1960s, James, and writes about the foundations of American literature—Melville, describes places where she lived and locations she visited, Wharton—and the changes in American fiction, though her reading is wide and international.

The Collected Essays of Elizabeth Hardwick New York Review Books Classics #ad - Selected and with an introduction by darryl pinckney, the Collected Essays gathers more than fifty essays for a fifty-year retrospective of Hardwick’s work from 1953 to 2003. She contemplates writers’ lives—women writers, Americans abroad—and the literary afterlife of biographies, rebels, letters, and diaries.

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Picture New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - Journalism of the Twentieth Century. Lillian ross worked at the new yorker for more than half a century, and might be described not only as an outstanding practitioner of modern long-form journalism but also as one of its inventors. Picture, is her most celebrated piece of reportage, originally published in 1952, a closely observed and completely absorbing story of how studio politics and misguided commercialism turn a promising movie into an all-around disaster.

The charismatic and hard-bitten director and actor john huston is at the center of the book, the first modern war novel, determined to make Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage—one of the great and defining works of American literature, a book whose vivid imagistic style invites the description of cinematic—into a movie that is worthy of it.

Then the studio bosses step in and the audience previews begin, and the movie is taken out of Huston’s hands, conferences are held, cut down by a third, and finally released—with results that please no one and certainly not the public: It was an expensive flop. A classic look at hollywood and the american film industry by The New Yorker's Lillian Ross, and named one of the "Top 100 Works of U.

Picture New York Review Books Classics #ad - S. In picture, which charlie chaplin aptly described as “brilliant and sagacious, ” Ross is a gadfly on the wall taking note of the operations of a system designed to crank out mediocrity. At first all goes well, he feels, as Huston shoots and puts together a two-hour film that is, the best he’s ever made.

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The Corner That Held Them New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - The nuns do their chores, and seek to maintain and improve the fabric of their house and chapel, and struggle with each other and with themselves. The book that emerges is a picture of a world run by women but also a story—stirring, witty, disturbing, utterly entrancing—of a community. A unique novel about life in a 14th-century convent by one of England's most original authors.

Sylvia townsend warner’s the corner that held them is a historical novel like no other, one that immerses the reader in the dailiness of history, rather than history as the given sequence of events that, in time, it comes to seem. Time ebbs and flows and characters come and go in this novel, set in the era of the Black Death, about a Benedictine convent of no great note.

The Corner That Held Them New York Review Books Classics #ad - . What is the life of a community and how does it support, or constrain, a real humanity? How do we live through it and it through us? These are among the deep questions that lie behind this rare triumph of the novelist’s art.

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A View of the Empire at Sunset: A Novel

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Her dream had always been to one day return home to Dominica. Six weeks later, filled with hostility for her home, she boarded a ship for England, never to return. In 1936, a forty-five-year-old Rhys was finally able to make the journey back to the Caribbean. A view of the empire at sunset is a look into her tempestuous and unsatisfactory life in Edwardian England, 1920s Paris, and then again in London.

Phillips’s gripping new novel is equally a story about the beginning of the end of a system that had sustained Britain for two centuries but that wreaked havoc on the lives of all who lived in the shadow of the empire: both men and women, colonizer and colonized. A true literary feat, a view of the empire at sunset uncovers the mysteries of the past to illuminate the predicaments of the present, exile, getting at the heart of alienation, and family by offering a look into the life of one of the greatest storytellers of the twentieth century and retelling a profound story that is singularly its own.

A View of the Empire at Sunset: A Novel #ad - Award-winning author caryl phillips presents a biographical novel of the life of Jean Rhys, the author of Wide Sargasso Sea, which she wrote as a prequel to Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre. Born ella gwendolyn rees williams in dominica at the height of the British Empire, Rhys lived in the Caribbean for only sixteen years before going to England.

Caryl phillips’s a view of the empire at Sunset is the sweeping story of the life of the woman who became known to the world as Jean Rhys.

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Berlin Alexanderplatz New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - The inspiration for rainer werner fassbinder's epic film and that The Guardian named one of the "Top 100 Books of All Time, " Berlin Alexanderplatz is considered one of the most important works of the Weimar Republic and twentieth century literature. Berlin alexanderplatz, farcical, the great novel of Berlin and the doomed Weimar Republic, and appalling, is one of the great books of the twentieth century, gruesome, word drunk, pitchdark.

And finally it hits him with monstrous and extreme violence. To begin with, he succeeds. In michael hofmann's extraordinary new translation, Alfred Döblin's masterpiece lives in English for the first time. As döblin writes in the opening pages: The subject of this book is the life of the former cement worker and haulier Franz Biberkopf in Berlin.

Berlin Alexanderplatz New York Review Books Classics #ad - Our man is able to get to his feet, he is still good to stand. Then it strikes him a low blow. Three times the force attacks him and disrupts his scheme. As ourstory begins, where he did time for some stupid stuff; now he is backin Berlin, he has just been released from prison, determined to go straight. But then, though doing all right for himself financially, he gets involved in aset-to with an unpredictable external agency that looks an awful lot like fate.

He has trouble getting up from that, he is almost counted out.

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Transit: A Novel Outline Trilogy Book 2

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one’s life, and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real. National bestseller • a finalist for the scotiabank giller prize • a finalist for the goldsmiths prize • longlisted for the international dublin literary award • one of time magazine's top 10 fiction books of the yeara new york times book Review Notable Book • Named a Best Book of the Year by Time, one of The New York Times Book Review’s ten best books of 2015In the wake of her family’s collapse, The Globe and Mail, San Francisco Chronicle, BOMB Magazine, NOW Magazine, and The National Post CanadaThe stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline, Commonweal, The Guardian, Southern Living, Book Depository, The Washington Independent Review of Books, a writer and her two young sons move to London.

The process of this upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions—personal, moral, artistic, and practical—as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children. In the city, and believe in, she is made to confront aspects of living that she has, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, until now, avoided, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, life.

Transit: A Novel Outline Trilogy Book 2 #ad - Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed novel Outline and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the moral problems of personal responsibility, the value of suffering, and the mystery of change.

In this second book of a precise, Cusk describes the most elemental experiences, short, yet epic cycle, the liminal qualities of life.

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Rock, Paper, Scissors: And Other Stories New York Review Books Classics

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NYRB Classics #ad - Osipov’s fiction presents a nuanced, collage-like portrait of life in provincial Russia—its tragedies, frustrations, and moments of humble beauty and inspiration. In the tradition of anton chekhov and William Carlos Williams, he draws on his experiences in medicine to write stories of great subtlety and striking insight.

The first english-language collection of a contemporary Russian master of the short story. Maxim osipov, who lives and practices medicine in a town ninety miles outside Moscow, is one of Russia’s best contemporary writers. The twelve stories in this volume depict doctors, teachers, and common criminals whose paths intersect in unpredictable yet entirely natural ways: in sickrooms, screenwriters, entrepreneurs, classrooms, local political bosses, actors, administrative offices and on trains and in planes.

Rock, Paper, Scissors: And Other Stories New York Review Books Classics #ad - Their encounters lead to disasters, major and minor epiphanies, and—on occasion—the promise of redemption.

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