A Million Windows

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David R. Godine, Publisher #ad - Not one window, but a million. In this, one of australia’s most acclaimed contemporary authors, takes these words as his starting point, are that house’s residents, exactly, A Million Windows, his latest work, and asks: Who, and what do they see from their respective rooms? His answer, Gerald Murnane, is a gorgeous if unsettling investigation into the glories and pitfalls of storytelling.

. The house of fiction, ” wrote Henry James, “has. Focusing on the importance of trust and the inevitability of betrayal in writing as in life, child and parent, its nested stories explore the fraught relationships between author and reader, boyfriend and girlfriend, husband and wife. Murnane’s fiction is woven from images-the reflections of the setting sun on distant windowpanes, a procession of dark-haired women, a clearing in a forest, seemingly limitless grasslands, the colors indigo and silver-grey, and the mysterious death of a young woman-which build to an emotional crescendo that is all the more powerful for the intricacy of its patterning.

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Border Districts: A Fiction

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - A bittersweet farewell to the world and the word by the Australian master“The mind is a place best viewed from borderlands. In border districts, a man moves from a capital city to a remote town in the border country, where he intends to spend the last years of his life. Which sights, and lines of verse will survive into the twilight? a dark-haired woman with a wistful expression? An ancestral house in the grasslands? The colors in translucent panes of glass, turns of phrase, in marbles and goldfish and racing silks? Feeling an increasing urgency to put his mental landscape in order, which people, the man sets to work cataloging this treasure, fictional characters, which books, little knowing where his “report” will lead and what secrets will be brought to light.

. Border districts is a jewel of a farewell from one of the greatest living writers of English prose. Border districts, and self-lacerating “report” on a life led as an avid reader, purportedly the Australian master Gerald Murnane’s final work of fiction, is a hypnotic, precise, ” and devout believer—but a believer not in the commonplaces of religion, fumbling lover, but rather in the luminescence of memory and its handmaiden, “student of mental imagery, literature.

Border Districts: A Fiction #ad - . It is time, to review the spoils of a lifetime of seeing, he thinks, a lifetime of reading.

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Stream System: The Collected Short Fiction of Gerald Murnane

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Stories from a mind-bending australian master, “a genius on the level of Beckett” Teju ColeNever before available to readers in this hemisphere, these stories—originally published from 1985 to 2012—offer an irresistible compendium of the work of one of contemporary fiction’s greatest magicians.

While the australian master gerald murnane’s reputation rests largely on his longer works of fiction, Beckett, his short stories stand among the most brilliant and idiosyncratic uses of the form since Borges, and Nabokov. Brutal, comic, ” which imagines the colonization of australia and the ultimate vengeance of its indigenous people as a series of nested dreams; to “Finger Web, Stream System runs from the haunting “Land Deal, obscene, and crystalline, fractal tale of the scars of war and the roots of misogyny; to “The Interior of Gaaldine, ” which tells a quietly terrifying, ” which finds its anxious protagonist stranded beyond the limits of fiction itself.

Stream System: The Collected Short Fiction of Gerald Murnane #ad - . No one else writes like murnane, and there are few other authors alive still capable of changing how—and why—we read.

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The Plains Text Classics

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Text Publishing #ad - Look closer, though, and it's a haunting nineteenth-century novel of colonial violence captured inside the machine's test-pattern image—a distant, unassuming house on the plains. Bomb. He has been a primary teacher, an editor and a university lecturer. First published in 1982, The Plains is a mesmerising work of startling originality.

A distinguished, distinctive, unforgettable novel. Shirley hazzard ‘… a piece of imaginative writing so remarkably sustained that it is a subject for meditation rather than a mere reading … In the depths and surfaces of this extraordinary fable you will see your inner self eerily reflected again and again.

The Plains Text Classics #ad - Sydney morning herald ‘The Plains has that peculiar singularity that can make literature great. Ed wright, best books of 2015 ‘murnane touches on foibles and philosophy, moving easily from earnest to deadpan to lightly ironic, the Kafka of the short stories, plays with the makings of a fable or allegory, a meld of Buster Keaton, Australian, and all the while toys with tone, and Swift in A Modest Proposal.

A provocative, delightful, diverting must-reread. Starred review, kirkus reviews ‘known for its sharp yet defamiliarizing take on the landscape and an aesthetic of purity historically associated with it, The Plains is uniformly described as a masterpiece of Australian literature. In 1999 murnane won the patrick white Award and in 2009 he won the Melbourne Prize for Literature.

This is the story of the families of the plains—obsessed with their land and history, their culture and mythology—and of the man who ventured into their world. His debut novel, was followed by ten other works of fiction, Tamarisk Row 1974, including The Plains and most recently Border Districts.

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Barley Patch Australian Literature Series

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Dalkey Archive Press #ad - In the spirit of italo calvino and Georges Perec, Barley Patch is like no other fiction being written today. Using the form of an oblique self-interrogation, personal query to fill in the details of a landscape entirely unique in world letters, a chronicle of the images from life and fiction that have endured and mingled in the author's mind, it begins with the Beckettian question "Must I write?" and proceeds to expand from this small, as well as the details and details within details that they contain.

. As interested, the narrator lays bare the act of writing and imagining, if not more so, in the characters from his books—finished or unfinished—as with the members of his family or his daily life, finally giving us a glimpse of the mythical place where the characters of fiction dwell before they come into existence in books.

Barley Patch Australian Literature Series #ad - Barley patch takes as its subject the reasons an author might abandon fiction—or so he thinks—forever.

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Tamarisk Row

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Giramondo Publishing #ad - Tamarisk row is gerald murnane's first novel, and in many respects his masterpiece, an unsparing evocation of a Catholic childhood in a Victorian country town in the late 1940s. Clement killeaton transforms his father's obsession with gambling, played in the dusty backyard of his home, the cruelty of his fellow pupils and the mysterious but forbidden attractions of sex, his mother's piety, across the landscapes of the district, into an imagined world centred on horse-racing, and the continent of Australia.

Out of the child's boredom and fear and fascination, Murnane's lyrical prose opens perspectives charged with yearning and illumination, offering in the process a truly original view of mid-twentieth-century Australia.

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Something for the Pain: A Memoir of the Turf

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Text Publishing #ad - His meticulous exploration of his lifelong obsession with horse racing is by turns hilarious, moving and profound. It is full of fast and loose stories and colourful characters…and lots of laughs. Stephen romei,  australian ‘something for the Pain bears testament to a lifelong obsession and further illustrates the breadth and depth of meaningfulness that Murnane can draw from a seemingly straightforward spectacle.

Australian book review ‘Murnane is a writer of the greatest skill and tonal control. Reading his description of the death of a racehorse in the arms of its owner-trainer at Flemington racecourse, tears rolled down my cheeks: “The man put his arms around the horse’s neck and pressed his face against the horse’s head.

It’s marvellous. His debut novel, was followed by nine other works of fiction, Tamarisk Row 1974, including The Plains now available as a Text Classic, and most recently A Million Windows. A brilliant book. Jonathan green, radio national Books and Arts ‘Murnane recounts his life through his abiding obsession with horse racing.

Something for the Pain: A Memoir of the Turf #ad - It is candid, droll and moving—a treat for lovers of literature and of the turf. Murnane discovered in these races more than he could find in religion or philosophy: they were the gateway to a world of imagination. If australian writing were a horse race, Murnane would be the winner by three and a half lengths.

Andy griffiths ‘a marvellous book about horse racing, one of the best this country has produced.

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Landscape with Landscape

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Giramondo Publishing #ad - The sixth story, as it imagines a paraguayan man imagining a country called Australia, is remarkable for its depth of emotion, ‘The Battle of Acosta Nu’, while his son sickens and dies before his eyes. In hindsight it can be seen to contain some of his best writing, and to offer a wide-ranging exploration of the different landscapes which make up the imagination of this extraordinary Australian writer.

Five of the six loosely connected stories also trace a journey through the suburbs of Melbourne in the 1960s, self-consciousness and intimacy, as the writer negotiates the conflicting demands of Catholicism and sex, alcohol and literature. I feel sorry for my fourth-eldest, which of all my book-children was the most brutally treated in its early years, ’ Murnane writes in his foreword to this new edition.

Landscape with Landscape #ad - When it was first published, thirty years ago, it was cruelly reviewed. Landscape with landscape is Gerald Murnane’s fourth book, after The Plains, and his first collection of short fiction.

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A Season on Earth

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Text Publishing #ad - Here, from fantasies about orgies with american film stars and idealised visions of suburban marital bliss to his struggles as a Catholic novice, is sixteen-year-old Adrian’s journey in full, at last, and finally a burgeoning sense of the boundless imaginative possibilities to be found in literature and landscapes.

Gerald murnane seems to be winning the wider regard his devotees have always known he deserved…a season on Earth is more like other novels, than the fictions to come, but Murnane is already determined to make his own forms…It is not simply an idiosyncratic take on the Australian Catholic upbringing, but a portrait of an artist as a young man, or more like a novel, in which one false vocation has to die so that a true vocation can take its place.

Age ‘a season on earth recalls us to the truth that murnane’s avant-gardism emerges out of a resolutely conventional soul…now that the novel’s excised half has been returned, we’re granted a fuller sense of Murnane’s original aims…The comedy here is no less wicked in deployment, but the edge is sharpened…Ludicrous and hectic as Adrian Sherd’s casting around for some stable sense of self may be, there is something moving in the efforts he makes…We see an artist inventing himself from scratch…By the end Sherd has not yet pinpointed those regions his mature art would explore.

The effect of his writing is to induce images in the reader’s own mind, and to hold the reader inside a world in which the reader is at every turn encouraged to turn his or her attention to those fast flocking images. New york times ‘murnane is quite simply one of the finest writers we have produced.

A Season on Earth #ad - Peter Craven. That is because, as murnane writes in his foreword, it is ‘only half a book and Adrian Sherd only half a character’. Lost to the world for more than four decades, tamarisk row, A Season on Earth is the essential link between two acknowledged masterpieces by Gerald Murnane: the lyrical account of boyhood in his debut novel, and the revolutionary prose of The Plains.

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